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Check out camp locations

Make My Summer is currently working with the following camps:

In California

Camp Augusta

YMCA Camp Whittle

In New York

Long Lake Performing Arts Camp

Long Lake Camp Adventures

In Pennsylvania

Independent Lake Camp

Camp Cayuga

Camp Lohikan

If you cannot find what you are looking for within these locations then please get in touch and tell us your aspiration for the summer as there are many more camps we work with indirectly or in a less formal role.

Life as a camp counsellor…is it really 24/7??

For residential camps it really is all systems go 24/7…sure the kids do sleep (fresh air and exercise is sure to mean even the most hyper sleep soundly) but that doesn’t mean there aren’t occasions when a camp counsellor is called upon in the middle of the night.  It’s one of the less glamorous sides of the job and thankfully for most, being woken in the night is a rare occurrence.

Staff really are the heart and soul of a camp so making sure you stay energised and rested will be a priority for camp management.  For most camps there will be a designated area for staff to hang out away from children and there will be certain hours in the day where staff will congregate and catch up socially.

Here is an example from Long Lake Camp:

“At Long Lake there are a few spots for staff to hang out; there is the loft, which is above the dining hall, the campers aren’t allowed in there so was a space away from the kids – if you weren’t required in the cabin counsellors could even sleep in there if  they wanted to so they weren’t woken up by the bell or the kids! There is also the F.A.B, which after the campers are in bed (which was 10pm) was a place you could hang out , there was TV’s to watch films or play video games and computers if you wanted to make travel plans etc. On camp not everywhere had WIFI but the loft and F.A.B did so counsellors could also use the WIFI to call home etc.

Counsellors have between 10pm- 12am if you aren’t on OD (On Duty, which means you watch a bunk until one of there counsellors signs in, you would do this once a week to share it between the counsellors) so counsellors have that time hang out, the camp put on a bus to the local hotel so you could go there for drinks or just hang out somewhere on camp. Counsellors at Long Lake get a period off a day (1 hour) so you could possibly go into town if you had a car or knew someone who would drive you. You could also use this time to do an activity on camp, for instance photography, the lake or sport. Though for the most part periods off are spent sleeping! It’s a good time to catch up with sleep as the campers aren’t supposed to be in the bunk during activity periods. Sleep or having long luxurious showers where you can take as long as you like to wash your hair – free time is definitely your chance to do things without being rushed!”

 

Can you recreate the magic?

Thinking of returning to work at camp again this year?  It’s natural to have a little apprehension as to whether your second, third or even fourth summers will be as good as the last.  We asked a seasoned pro now going into her fourth year, how you might expect things to differ each year you work at camp.

“Although it undoubtedly gets easier, there are definitely still unique challenges that accompany every summer!

It’s great to be able to go back to camp and know exactly how the schedule works and the ins and outs of the logistics. This also puts you in a good position to be able to help new counselors! I’ve been lucky enough to be afforded more responsibility each year I’ve returned, which I appreciate as an opportunity to learn and grow every summer. There are lots of staff and campers that are regulars at camp, and it’s so exciting to be able to see all those people again, especially when lots of them live in completely different parts of the world! I met my best friend at camp and returning means that I get to spend 8 or 9 weeks with her each year.

However, returning to camp also means that more is expected of you. Managers sometimes have less patience with you because you should already know the ropes. This isn’t necessarily a bad thing, I think it’s important to be held to a high standard, but definitely something that is different. Sometimes you return to camp expecting everything to be exactly the same and this will never be the case. The people will be different and this changes the overall feel. It can be strange because when you get back to camp it feels like you never left, but at the same time there are many things that have changed.

Going back to camp can also be exciting, because camps grow and change over time. Every year at ILC there is new equipment, buildings and activities. Being a part of this growth makes you feel like you are really a part of camp, rather than just there for a single summer.”

 

Each camp year will be different and I think that’s what keeps it exciting. It’s hard to not expect everything to be the same, and some summers will definitely be better than others, but the unique challenges that each one presents and the new people that you will undoubtedly meet make it well worthwhile.

Sometimes all you need is a hug

We asked Siubhan, a counselor and circus instructor at Independent Lake Camp, what life is like if you are having a bad day whilst working at summer camp…

“At Independent Lake Camp, the support system for bunk counselors is excellent. We work directly under our head counselors, who are at camp to ensure not only that the campers are having a great time but that the staff are happy, because the counselors that are best at their jobs are also the ones that are happiest! If there are ever any problems with campers, other staff, or personal issues, the head counselors are always there and always very approachable. Sometimes even if all you need is a hug because you’ve had a bad day, head counselors are happy to provide that, and maybe even some snacks or a listening ear.

There are three head counselors at camp, a boys and a girls ‘Lakeside’ head (the older campers) and an ‘Elkview’ head (the younger campers). Although you work with one more closely than the others depending on which bunk you are in, all of them are always approachable and willing to help with any problems. They care so much about bunk counselors’ and campers’ wellbeing that sometimes they sacrifice their own! So it’s important for us to support them as well and do our jobs to the best of our ability.

In addition to head counselors, I am very lucky to work in the circus department, which is often referred to as a family. Everyone in the department is close with each other and extremely supportive. Our heads of department are strong female leaders who I look up to and have learned a lot from. They have always been there to help me with any issues that I have, both within the department and outside of it. From not knowing what tricks to teach a specific camper or how to put an act together, to trouble I’m having in the bunk, I know I can count on not only my peers but also the senior members of staff. There are sometimes days when teaching is really hard because you’re sick or missing home, and they will always do their best to support you and make everything just a little bit easier.”

Spotlight on…video counselors

Here we find out from Jenny, a two time summer camp pro, what life is like as a video counselor

“My role as  a video and bunk counsellor meant that I was primarily making camper films. This meant me working with kid(s) to create a film that they wanted – this ranged from voice over films to short films often based on films/books that were already out. I would work with them from writing the script until editing. As well as this the video team filmed all the performing arts nights, chamber music nights, rock nights, events (such as July 4th), bunk shout outs… Our camp ran a tech week and a parents weekend and during these we would film all the plays, musicals, dance shows, circus shows and the variety show.

All this filming was a team effort – we distributed the shows between the video staff so different people would do credits, titles, colour correcting and tweaking the audio when needed. For the 3rd session I was doing video diaries, for which I had to create eight videos for the different departments around camp. This involved me going around camp, to rehearsals for shows, or music lessons and even out on the lake! Filming the kids having a great time and from that I then edited the footage and created the video diaries.

As well as having a specific job role I was also a bunk counsellor which means you live with a group of children in a bunk (some camps call it a cabin) and you look after them. You have to count them when you go to morning/afternoon meetings, whenever you go to the dining hall, you eat with them, get them to clean their teeth etc  Most importantly you are one of first people they should come to if they need anything.”

First impressions that make forever memories

We asked Alice, a costume designer for Long Lake Camp, to describe her first impressions of summer camp:

“Arriving at camp was all kinds of emotions – exciting, nervous, overwhelming, overpowering and crazy! I was extremely nervous on the run up to going to camp and I even remember getting quite emotional saying bye at the airport to my family as I just didn’t really know what to expect! It was also the first time I had flown solo on a long-haul flight so that was quite daunting too!

On the first day arriving at camp we had a quick welcome chat with the camp director and then in the first 10 minutes I was told who I would be bunking with and I went with a bunk mate to the cabin! Everyone was so friendly and welcoming which was so reassuring and I was definitely getting more excited now! My bunk mates had worked at this camp before, so I knew If I had any questions they would help me out, I was also bunking with a newbie too who was also working in the tech department so that was comforting too. That night the whole camps staff relaxed and chilled by the bonfire which over looked the beautiful lake which was a great chance to introduce and get to know other staff members! I felt so overwhelmed that I finally arrived at camp and the fact that I didn’t know anyone felt like it was my first day of school! It was nice to know that it wasn’t just me that felt like this. Camp was beautiful, and I will always remember looking at the lake for the first time that day remembering ‘wow’!

Leaving camp after 10 weeks was really sad and I had made such amazing memories and friendships over the summer. It was so special, and I felt so proud of myself for doing something for me that summer and going out and doing something that felt so rewarding, fulfilling and satisfying. Now after going to camp for two summers I still feel a sense of achievement and I still remember how nervous I was on that first day of camp!”